Innovations

Pomodoro: The Method of the Successful

There are many great and efficient methods of managing time. Among them is the “tomato” principle also known as Pomodoro. Let’s figure out how it works and what it has to do with tomatoes.

The Pomodoro method was conceived by Francesco Cirillo. In the 1980s, while still doing his university degree, he couldn’t imagine that his time-management ideas could soon make him famous.

There are many great and efficient methods of managing time. Among them is the “tomato” principle also known as Pomodoro. Let’s figure out how it works and what it has to do with tomatoes.

Pomodoro_html_27409846b98f0a0d

The Pomodoro method was conceived by Francesco Cirillo. In the 1980s, while still doing his university degree, he couldn’t imagine that his time-management ideas could soon make him famous.

Cirillo studied quite well. He was diligent and spent most of his personal time on textbooks; however, he soon realized that the hours spent on studying didn’t equal the outcome. The first exams he failed proved his assumptions.

Armed with a tomato-shaped kitchen timer, Francesco then scheduled his time for learning in short cycles. This helped him improve concentration as well as get some rest.

Later Cirillo concluded that his idea was also important for correct goal setting and boosting work productivity. Besides, it served as an impetus. All those conclusions laid the foundation for demonstrating the results of his research to a broad audience.

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So, how Pomodoro works? By Cirillo’s calculations, one “tomato” equals 30 minutes. 25 of them belong to work, and five—to rest.

Before your thirty-minute chunk begins, you need to plan your assignments, grading them by importance. You can either write this on paper or use special apps, like Clockwork Tomato, Pomodorium, Tomighty, and so on.

As soon as the “to-do” list is complete, set on the timer. After 25 minutes, you will hear the long-awaited signal indicating the deserved break. These five minutes must be totally devoted to your distraction from work. The next signal will usher in another productive session. 

Overall, the full Pomodoro cycle equals two hours (4 “tomatoes”). After a two-hour working session, you need to relax for 15–30 minutes.

By the way, don’t forget to check the completed tasks in the list you prepared. This helps boost your motivation and productivity.

The human mind tends to wander, which will inevitably distract you from the core activity at least once. Experts recommend recording such cases, grading them by importance from 1 to 10. This will help you analyse the situation and assess your productivity down the line.

Also, you should “revise” your work after all planned “tomatoes” are completed. It must take no more than 3–5 minutes.

The above-mentioned rules are rigid and shouldn’t be bent to somebody’s liking. The twenty-five-minute working session must be uninterrupted. In case you manage to complete your task in less than one “tomato”, add another one (or more). Breaking your working session is like a game over. If you fail—you start again.

Pomodoro_html_e5329cb79ac1a952

However, some assignments require way more than one “tomato”. Then they must be thoroughly reconsidered and split into several tasks—this way, they won’t seem too big and impossible to complete.

Today’s time-management innovators are trying to improve the Pomodoro method. But why change something that has been running smoothly for decades? All these “tomatoes” have got their high-quality mark!

Cirillo studied quite well. He was diligent and spent most of his personal time on textbooks; however, he soon realized that the hours spent on studying didn’t equal the outcome. The first exams he failed proved his assumptions.

Armed with a tomato-shaped kitchen timer, Francesco then scheduled his time for learning in short cycles. This helped him improve concentration as well as get some rest.

Later Cirillo concluded that his idea was also important for correct goal setting and boosting work productivity. Besides, it served as an impetus. All those conclusions laid the foundation for demonstrating the results of his research to a broad audience.

So, how Pomodoro works? By Cirillo’s calculations, one “tomato” equals 30 minutes. 25 of them belong to work, and five—to rest.

Before your thirty-minute chunk begins, you need to plan your assignments, grading them by importance. You can either write this on paper or use special apps, like Clockwork Tomato, Pomodorium, Tomighty, and so on.

As soon as the “to-do” list is complete, set on the timer. After 25 minutes, you will hear the long-awaited signal indicating the deserved break. These five minutes must be totally devoted to your distraction from work. The next signal will usher in another productive session. 

Overall, the full Pomodoro cycle equals two hours (4 “tomatoes”). After a two-hour working session, you need to relax for 15–30 minutes.

By the way, don’t forget to check the completed tasks in the list you prepared. This helps boost your motivation and productivity.

The human mind tends to wander, which will inevitably distract you from the core activity at least once. Experts recommend recording such cases, grading them by importance from 1 to 10. This will help you analyse the situation and assess your productivity down the line.

Also, you should “revise” your work after all planned “tomatoes” are completed. It must take no more than 3–5 minutes.

The above-mentioned rules are rigid and shouldn’t be bent to somebody’s liking. The twenty-five-minute working session must be uninterrupted. In case you manage to complete your task in less than one “tomato”, add another one (or more). Breaking your working session is like a game over. If you fail—you start again.

Pomodoro_html_5a3960acf3bc409e

However, some assignments require way more than one “tomato”. Then they must be thoroughly reconsidered and split into several tasks—this way, they won’t seem too big and impossible to complete.

Today’s time-management innovators are trying to improve the Pomodoro method. But why change something that has been running smoothly for decades? All these “tomatoes” have got their high-quality mark!